Trollstigen pass in Norway carved out by snowplows

  • The clip shows bright yellow diggers carving out the Trollstigen serpentine pass
  • The road in Rauma Municipality is closed every November and covered in snow
  • Every spring workers go through the month-long process of unearthing it again
  • Footage shows fountains of snow burst into the air in a blank white landscape 

This astounding drone footage shows the fascinating process of unearthing a mountain road out of ten feet of snow in Norway.

Every year diggers and snowploughs are sent to the Trollstigen serpentine pass in Rauma Municipality to make it usable for the summer season.

The road connects the town of Andalsnes with the village of Vallda and is noted for its spectacular views.

Snow limit: The vehicles carve their way through ten foot high ice walls to unearth the road

Snow limit: The vehicles carve their way through ten foot high ice walls to unearth the road

It is vulnerable to avalanches and for this reason the pass is closed by the Norwegian authorities every November for the winter. 

Eventually the road becomes completely covered in several feet of snow.

To make it available to vehicles again workers from the Norwegian Public Roads Administration first have to locate the road on a huge white canvas.

They begin work in the spring and the process of unearthing the tarmac takes about a month.

The drone footage shows the road as just a thin snaking line through a blank landscape

The drone footage shows the road as just a thin snaking line through a blank landscape

The snowplough fires fountains of snow into the air. The process takes place every year and lasts about a month

The snowplough fires fountains of snow into the air. The process takes place every year and lasts about a month

The footage shows fountains of snow sprayed high into the air as the NPRA get to work in a beautiful landscape. 

The end of the clip shows  the camera pulling away to show the vast area that still needs to be carved.

Trollstigen was opened in 1936 by King Haakon VII and is used by thousands of tourists in the summer, who enjoy it for its 10 per cent decline and numerous hairpin bends. 


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